Come On, Take It

Without reservation

According To Hoyt

Yesterday, on a private forum a friend of mine who here will go under the name Sam Anderson said the following:

Patriotism is good. Nationalism through a patriotic lens, seeing your country as worthwhile, as having prospects and things to be proud of, is not only acceptable but necessary for the health of any nation. But MOST especially the United States, because it’s one thing for the French to be ashamed of being French, but at the end of the day, they’re still going to be French. France is established on ethnic and historical foundations, and even if the French think they suck, there can still be citizens of France. Just not very long, since self-loathing aligns you, first metaphorically, then inevitably in practice, with enemies who ALSO loathe you.

But an American just CAN’T believe in nothing, CAN’T reject the philosophy underpinning America, and be one. Philosophy IS America…

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The Liturgy Wars: It’s Not About You

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Hear, Hear!

The Catholic Geeks

I’ve already talked quite extensively on why the music we hear at Mass is more than a matter of personal taste.  I’ve already explained why the “art for art’s sake” at the Mass is just as much a problem as the former, just in the opposite direction.  I’ve also taken the time to address why the obligatory pre-Mass Rosary can be abused, and why things that clutter up the end of Mass, like announcements, “children’s bulletins,” and so on, are just as dangerous to our souls as bad music.

I gave good reasons for all of those things, and I think I made fairly convincing arguments, but there’s so much more to it than people just not knowing the proper forms.

I may have been addressing the wrong problem all this time, and now it’s well past time to fix that.

I saw this on Fox News’s website…

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On A Far Distant Shore, Complete

A free story of the USAians from Sarah A. Hoyt.

According To Hoyt

UPDATE: Because the post was so late yesterday and because I have a massive outline to read (Larry Correia has outlined Monster Hunter Guardian for our collaboration and sent it to me) as well as a project to finish, I decided to let this hang until tomorrow.  Thanks for understanding.

*It’s unproofed.  Forgive me.  Of course, it’s also free.  I’ll probably clean it and sell it in a tales of the USAians collection, eventually.*

onafardistantshorecover

On A Far Distant Shore

Sarah A. Hoyt

It was nothing. Less than nothing. A glimpse out of the corner of the eye, a flash of color. Tell me, is that something to risk life and security on? For a stranger? And one you never liked?

I’m not a fighter. My parents tried to make me one, at least as far as their religion demanded. Weekends of camping rough and weeks of training in survival and…

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Buy a Book, Help People in the US Get Running Water

An author and blogger friend of mine, T. L. Knighton, has posted an article on his blog from author Kenton Kilgore who has promised 100% of the proceeds from the December 2015 sales of Kenton’s book Dragontamer’s Daughters, newly revised and re-released earlier this year, to the non-profit DIGDEEP. Here is the link to Tom’s blog. It has all the links to Kenton’s blog and more about DIGDEEP’s Navajo Water Project. The Kindle book is only $2.99, folks.

Book Review: Thirteenth Child by Patricia C. Wrede (Frontier Magic #1)

Thirteenth Child (Frontier Magic, #1)Thirteenth Child by Patricia C. Wrede
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

At the beginning of the story, the narrator is a five-year-old child and I was impressed at how the author captured the tone and syntax perfectly. I felt as if I were listening to a child relate the tale of being bullied by her uncle and cousins, being called bad blood and cursed. The innocent honesty shone through. As the story progresses and the narrator, our heroine ‘Eff’ (which we eventually find out stands for Francine) matures and so does the tone and style of her narration. The plain honesty and inner dialogue are still there, but the language matures and so does the character’s insight. The people around Eff are well-fleshed and well-written. Some are more simple than others, just as in real life. The assumption of everyone using and having magic (except the Rationalists), incorporating it into daily life and everything around them, is not a fresh idea, but well-done in this story and well blended into the history of the story world. The foreshadowing of further developments in the series looks promising. I am a fan of Wrede’s work anyway. I can’t wait to see what Eff, William, and Lan get up to next.

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Book Review: Silver on the Road by Laura Anne Gilman (Devil’s West #1)

Silver on the RoadSilver on the Road by Laura Anne Gilman
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

At sundown on her sixteenth birthday, Isobel Lacoyo Tavora, or Izzy, reaches majority and ends her indenture to the devil. She had been Bargained as payment by her parents as a toddler. A day later, she signed her own Bargain with the devil and became Isobel nee Lacoyo Tavora, The Left Hand of the Devil.
Set in an alternate history where the United States ends at the Mudwater (Mississippi River) and the Spanish Protectorate reaches from the west coast to the Sierra Madres, the story of Izzy travels the Devil’s West, which spans all the Territory between. Izzy will be a rider, traveling the Road, seeking out injustice and fulfilling justice, Maleh Mishpat. Her mentoring trip, under the guidance of Gabriel Kusan, is eventful and terrifying, a baptism by fire. A stricken farmstead, an empty outpost, missing silver miners, a mad magician, and a group of monks all point to a greater evil that is cracking the bones of the Territory and Izzy is the only one who can deal with it. Whether she can survive the task is another matter.

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A Blast From The Future

Would the future know elephants?

According To Hoyt

Come closer, children, and spread ears like elephants’.

Let me tell you about the time of the ancestors.  You’ve heard all the stories and I know most of you don’t believe them, but listen to me who am old and remember.

Yes, it is true that men could fly through the air like birds, only faster than birds.  They could go to the other side of the Earth because they wanted to see what was there.

Yes, it is true that the great sorcerers of that time had created a magic that could project your image anywhere.  People saw what was happening on the other side of the world even without going there.

Yes, it is true that people could put their opinions — or their breakfast, or their cat pictures — up in a place where anyone in the world could see them, so that if someone was lying…

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